Sculpture is music that has frozen in time. This is the imperishable classic of Antiquity, and folk songs from the Middle Ages, and modern covers, in which new notes and chords can be heard. Let's hear what the last of them will tell us - the London sculptures of the twentieth century.

Newton, Eduardo Paolozzi (1995, British Library). There are works by Eduardo Paolozzi in almost every corner of London. You probably already saw one of them at the Tottenham Court Road metro station or near the Design Museum. But the most outstanding creation of the great sculptor is the statue of Isaac Newton next to the British Library. The very idea the author borrowed from William Blake: he has a drawing on which Newton is depicted in a philosophical pose. He seems to be thinking on why the apple fell. A peculiar mixture of creativity and science - a suitable image for the library, near which this statue is located.

Lioness and Lesser Kudu, Jonathan Kenworthy (1993, Grosvenor Gardens). Unlike most of the sculptors on this list, Kenworthy portrays realistic forms, abandoning abstractness and representativeness. Everyone knows his animal sculptures, which can be found throughout the city. But the statue "Lioness and Lesser Kudu" is rightfully considered one of the best. It captured bright representatives of the African fauna who live their usual life: a lioness hunts the prey, and kudu tries to save its life running away from a bloodthirsty predator.

Madonna and Child, Jacob Epstein (1952, Cavendish Square). The robots of this sculptor-rebel caused a flurry of criticism from the public. Sure, since they are made in the nude style. But this elegant statue above the entrance to the Holy Child Jesus Monastery received general approval.

Large Mirror Nijinski, Barry Flanagan (1992, Mall). There are several works of Flanagan in London, but the most notable of his works are these hares near the Admiralty Arch. The idea is very strange, but this is the style of Barry Flanagan.

Fulcrum, Richard Serra (1987, Broadgate). Not everyone will come up with the idea of ​​making crossbeams which hold each other as a symbol of artistic harmony. But this is modernism, and it is full of philosophical concepts.

Two-piece bronze statue, "Two-piece reclining figure, no. 3", Henry Moore (1963, Kennington). British sculptor Henry Moore is well known in the capital. His work is in the park Hampstead Heath, the area of ​​Pimlico and Westminster. But our top-10 included his two- piece bronze statue Reclining Figure No 3, which stands in the Kennington area.

Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick (1984, Canary Wharf). What couple are you talking about? About a man with a square head and a woman with a triangular head. Is it because they are tired of watching the numerous rendezvous near Cabot Square? We can only imagine this.

Rush Hour, George Segal (1983, Broadgate). The bronze sculpture of Segal depicts six melancholic figures that goes away from the UBS building. Probably, they symbolize the daily routine with which the bank employees have to face.

Single Form, Barbara Hepworth (1962, Battersea Park). This piece of bronze over 10 feet high is a memorial in honor of Dag Hammarskjöld, the UN Secretary General, who died in a plane crash in 1961.

Homage To Leonardo, Enzo Plazzotta (1982, Belgrave Square). This is a kind of interpretation of the two-dimensional drawing by Leonardo da Vinci "The Vitruvian Man."

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Top 10 modern sculptures of London

Sculpture is music that has frozen in time. This is the imperishable classic of Antiquity, and folk songs from the Middle Ages, and modern covers, in which new notes and chords can be heard. Let's hear what the last of them will tell us - the London sculptures of the twentieth century.

Newton, Eduardo Paolozzi (1995, British Library). There are works by Eduardo Paolozzi in almost every corner of London. You probably already saw one of them at the Tottenham Court Road metro station or near the Design Museum. But the most outstanding creation of the great sculptor is the statue of Isaac Newton next to the British Library. The very idea the author borrowed from William Blake: he has a drawing on which Newton is depicted in a philosophical pose. He seems to be thinking on why the apple fell. A peculiar mixture of creativity and science - a suitable image for the library, near which this statue is located.

Lioness and Lesser Kudu, Jonathan Kenworthy (1993, Grosvenor Gardens). Unlike most of the sculptors on this list, Kenworthy portrays realistic forms, abandoning abstractness and representativeness. Everyone knows his animal sculptures, which can be found throughout the city. But the statue "Lioness and Lesser Kudu" is rightfully considered one of the best. It captured bright representatives of the African fauna who live their usual life: a lioness hunts the prey, and kudu tries to save its life running away from a bloodthirsty predator.

Madonna and Child, Jacob Epstein (1952, Cavendish Square). The robots of this sculptor-rebel caused a flurry of criticism from the public. Sure, since they are made in the nude style. But this elegant statue above the entrance to the Holy Child Jesus Monastery received general approval.

Large Mirror Nijinski, Barry Flanagan (1992, Mall). There are several works of Flanagan in London, but the most notable of his works are these hares near the Admiralty Arch. The idea is very strange, but this is the style of Barry Flanagan.

Fulcrum, Richard Serra (1987, Broadgate). Not everyone will come up with the idea of ​​making crossbeams which hold each other as a symbol of artistic harmony. But this is modernism, and it is full of philosophical concepts.

Two-piece bronze statue, "Two-piece reclining figure, no. 3", Henry Moore (1963, Kennington). British sculptor Henry Moore is well known in the capital. His work is in the park Hampstead Heath, the area of ​​Pimlico and Westminster. But our top-10 included his two- piece bronze statue Reclining Figure No 3, which stands in the Kennington area.

Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick (1984, Canary Wharf). What couple are you talking about? About a man with a square head and a woman with a triangular head. Is it because they are tired of watching the numerous rendezvous near Cabot Square? We can only imagine this.

Rush Hour, George Segal (1983, Broadgate). The bronze sculpture of Segal depicts six melancholic figures that goes away from the UBS building. Probably, they symbolize the daily routine with which the bank employees have to face.

Single Form, Barbara Hepworth (1962, Battersea Park). This piece of bronze over 10 feet high is a memorial in honor of Dag Hammarskjöld, the UN Secretary General, who died in a plane crash in 1961.

Homage To Leonardo, Enzo Plazzotta (1982, Belgrave Square). This is a kind of interpretation of the two-dimensional drawing by Leonardo da Vinci "The Vitruvian Man."

Read other news here

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